E14 Andrew Keen: Internet Sceptic

Andrew-Keen

In this episode we talk to Andrew Keen.  Keen started life as an internet entrepreneur  but is best known for his books that critique the impact the internet has on our culture, politics, and society.

Keen has written 3 books on the subject of the internet;

  1. The Cult of the Amateur: How Today’s Internet Is Killing Our Culture
  2. Digital Vertigo: How Today’s Online Social Revolution Is Dividing, Diminishing, And Disorienting Us
  3. The Internet Is Not The Answer

Many of the criticisms that are currently directed at the internet were first voiced by Keen and given that he is very much an internet insider, working out of Silicon Valley, his warnings must be heeded.

Keen is a vehement critic of what he calls ‘Digital Narcissism’ and in particular the ‘Selfie Culture’ which accompanies the hypervisibilty promoted by sites such as facebook and twitter.  He also rails against the impact this connectiveness has on essential parts of the human experience that are rapidly becoming neglected such as privacy and solitude.

Keen is a contrarian, encouraging us to check the depth of the water before we jump off the cliff.  What’s most encouraging about his work is the fact that his manifesto isn’t just a list of what’s wrong with our attitutes towards the net and our use of it.  He also offers direction for how best to use this technology to improve society in the future.

Keen believes that the digital revolution we are experiencing is every bit as monumental as the industrial revolution in the impact it is having on how we operate in the world.  He argues that the internet has grown up now and that it’s time it started behaving more responsibly.

Enjoy the episode,

Dave

You can check out Andrew Keen's website here.
Andrew has several great online talks, my favourite is from TEDutretch in 2012, watch it here.
You can follow Andrew on twitter @ajkeen.
The short video for Andrew's latest book can be viewed here.

2 thoughts on “E14 Andrew Keen: Internet Sceptic”

It's good to talk

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